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Philadelphia Museum Showcases Bongs as High Art

 1 min read

National Liberty Museum "Treachery of Images" Exhibit

We at DankStop think all bongs are beautiful, so it’s a pleasure to see some of America’s best glass artists getting their due at Philadelphia’s National Liberty Museum. Till May 7th, this museum will have an exhibit titled “The Treachery of Images”, which will feature over 50 hand-crafted water pipes from 20 prominent glass producers.

"The Treachery of Images" By Rene Magritte

The title of the exhibit is a reference to a 1929 Belgian surrealist painting by Rene Magritte, which features a pipe and French text saying “This Is Not A Pipe.” Appropriately, the museum’s glass director - Meegan Coll - said in an interview with Fox News that she wants “the viewer not to think about the fact that these are pipes, but to look more broadly at them.” That’s not hard to do; some of the pieces displayed include California born Nikolai Morse’s “Ego Lock” which is as captivating to look at as it would be to use.

Ego Lock by Nikolai Morse

The goal of the exhibit is to give a platform for underground glass artists like Nikolai and many others. Aside from diehard enthusiasts, most people never get to see the amazing work of functional glassblowers. As remarked by Coll, “you really have to appreciate the art and the skill it takes to execute the creation of these pieces.”

Not only will be viewers be able to see these bongs, they can buy them as well!

Freija

Artists Banjo and Snic Barnes' pipe - titled “Freija” after the Norse goddess of love - is valued at a whopping $250,000! Aside from Freija, the pipes displayed at the exhibit have garnered the attention of several art buyers, according to museum CEO Gwen Borowsky; “A lot of people who buy these pieces buy them as pieces of art and not to smoke out of...these are pieces that you wouldn’t want to put a match to.”

Founded on the idea that glass art is a powerful expression of freedom, The National Liberty Museum’s directors hope that “The Treachery of Images” will make mainstream art fans see the value of the functional glass industry.

The National Liberty Museum is on 321 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. The exhibit is open to all museum visitors from 10am-5pm. Museum admission is $7 for adults, $5 for students and $6 for seniors. Go to this link to learn more about the exhibit and the National Liberty Museum.

Images Courtesy of CBS Philly and Philly.Com


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